How to Crush Criticism with Confidence

Several months ago, I received an email about an article I had written. The client needed a short blog post about education trends, and he hated it.

“Your points were all over the place. You need to fix this!”

The truth is, the email hurt me. As a freelance writer who spends hours on a single article, I didn’t embrace the feedback very well. For a moment, I thought I wasn’t good enough. Despite how annoyed I was by my client’s comment, I sucked it up and edited it.

Because here’s another truth: We can’t avoid criticism.

Whether you’re in a personal or professional environment, they’re everywhere. While criticism may sound soul-crushing and ego-bruising, but there are more to criticism than just its negativity.

Whenever someone criticises your work, it wasn’t directed at you, but your work. Surprisingly, we can’t shake off that feeling that it was a personal attack against us.

If you’re a hustler with criticism crisis, here are four best ways to crush criticism with confidence.

1. Detach yourself from your work
“Don’t take it personally” is easier said than done. When you poured your heart and soul into a project or presentation, it’s challenging not to feel the pinch from an honest criticism. After all, our work is an extension of our ego.

You must also know that your work is an extension of your skills. When your boss says ‘your presentation lacks research’ or ‘your project isn’t your best work’, you know you need to step up your game.

When someone takes their time to offer their feedback and advice, it demonstrates that they want to bring out the best in you. Isn’t that what we want for ourselves? Remember, don’t take it personally. Criticism is not a personal attack against you.

2. Every criticism is a lesson
Criticism is a tough cookie, and it’s unfortunate that we don’t stop to appreciate its sweet and creamy center. Within its bitter shell, every criticism is a lesson in disguise.

When your marketing manager points out a flaw in your presentation or your colleague suggests an improvement in your project, it’s an opportunity for you to make it better. Criticism is tough to hear at first, but if it provides a chance to grow, why not seize it?

3. Listen openly to criticism
When we hear criticism, it’s our natural instinct to put our guards up. We loathe it and prefer to stay as far as possible. The best way to crush criticism is to change our perspectives about it.

Criticism is a not a sum of harsh feedbacks. They’re lessons for self-improvement and self-development. The moment we see criticism in a positive light, we will warm up to the idea of receiving feedback.

Instead of being defensive, listen to what your boss and colleagues have to say. The reality is, they only want the best for you.

4. Brush it off and ignore
While most criticisms are designed to make you better, there are comments that are borderline rude and unnecessary. We’re talking about verbal bullying that stems from jealousy and hatred. The kind that aims to get on your last nerves than motivate you.

The moment you give criticism the permission to affect you, your emotions will be snowballed into anger. We all know that these emotions can bring out the worst in us.

Our favourite way to handle rudeness? Just brush it off and ignore. A confident female hustler knows that rude comments are beneath them. Besides, you have more important things to do than replying to every single hater in your Instagram account. Ignorance is bliss, they say.

Final say
Love it or hate it, criticisms are unavoidable in our personal and professional lives. If you’re a female hustler who believes in self-improvement, you know honest feedbacks and constructive criticism can take you further. Try it: Treat criticism as a lesson in disguise or listen objectively to any feedback. Once you look beyond the scope of negativity, you can embrace any criticism thrown your way.

This article titled ‘How to Crush Criticism with Confidence’ was published on The Female Hustlers in May 2018. Kindly refer to this link to view from its original publication.